Press "Enter" to skip to content

Visualizing All the Electric Car Models Available in the US – Visual Capitalist

Charted: U.S. Consumer Debt Approaches $16 Trillion
Why Investors Tuned Out Netflix
Satellite Maps: Shanghai’s Supply Chain Standstill
Objects of Desire: Record Breaking Auction Sales in 2021
Visualizing Ukraine’s Top Trading Partners and Products
Synthetic Biology: The $3.6 Trillion Science Changing Life as We Know It
How Do Big Tech Giants Make Their Billions?
How Much Radiation is Emitted by Popular Smartphones?
How the Top Cryptocurrencies Performed in 2021
The 20 Internet Giants That Rule the Web
Charted: U.S. Consumer Debt Approaches $16 Trillion
Objects of Desire: Record Breaking Auction Sales in 2021
The Richest People in the World in 2022
Who Are the Russian Oligarchs?
The World’s Billionaires, by Generation
Visualizing How COVID-19 Antiviral Pills and Vaccines Work at the Cellular Level
Mapped: The Most Common Illicit Drugs in the World
Visualizing The Most Widespread Blood Types in Every Country
Pandemic Recovery: Have North American Downtowns Bounced Back?
Ranked: The Most Prescribed Drugs in the U.S.
Mapped: Solar and Wind Power by Country
How Far Are We From Phasing Out Coal?
Mapped: U.S. Wind Electricity Generation by State
Visualizing the History of Energy Transitions
Interactive Map: Crude Oil Pipelines and Refineries of the U.S. and Canada
Mapped: Solar and Wind Power by Country
Mapped: Gas Prices in America at All-Time Highs
Mapped: Global Happiness Levels in 2022
Mapped: All the World’s Military Personnel
A Visual Guide to Europe’s Member States
The 50 Minerals Critical to U.S. Security
Visualizing China’s Dominance in Clean Energy Metals
The Periodic Table of Commodity Returns (2012-2021)
Visualizing the Abundance of Elements in the Earth’s Crust
Rare Earth Elements: Where in the World Are They?
Synthetic Biology: The $3.6 Trillion Science Changing Life as We Know It
How Far Are We From Phasing Out Coal?
Visualizing All Electric Car Models Available in the U.S.
Mapped: U.S. Wind Electricity Generation by State
Visualizing the World’s Loss of Forests Since the Ice-Age
Published
on
By
Graphic showcasing all electric car models available in the U.S.

Can I share this graphic?
Yes. Visualizations are free to share and post in their original form across the web—even for publishers. Please link back to this page and attribute Visual Capitalist.

When do I need a license?
Licenses are required for some commercial uses, translations, or layout modifications. You can even whitelabel our visualizations. Explore your options.

Interested in this piece?
Click here to license this visualization.

America’s electric vehicle (EV) market has surged over the last decade, and it’s only expected to grow further. The Biden administration has allocated billions towards the EV transition in the hopes that by 2030, electric cars make up 50% of all new cars sales in America.
Given the rising demand, what types of electric car models are available for U.S. consumers to choose from today?
This graphic, using data from Car and Driver and EPA, highlights every single EV that’s available for sale across America, showing the wide range of manufacturers, vehicle types, and prices.
As of February 2022, there are 28 different electric vehicles available in the U.S., from 18 different manufacturers. Here are their base model statistics:
As of February 2022. *Indicates EPA data on fuel economy and range was only available for 2021 models.
At less than $30,000, the Nissan Leaf and Mini Cooper SE are currently the most affordable options for Americans.
Released in 2010, the Nissan Leaf is one of the oldest EVs on the market. Widely considered a pioneer in the EV space, it’s one of the top-selling electric cars in the U.S.—in 2021, more than 14,000 cars were sold in America.
While the Leaf’s low price point may be appealing to many, it has the third shortest maximum range on the list at 149 miles before needing a recharge. The only other cars with shorter ranges were the Mini Cooper SE and the Mazda MX-30.
GMC’s Hummer EV pickup is the most expensive EV on the list, with a base price point of $110,295—however, GMC is planning to release less expensive versions of the Hummer EV over the coming years.
The only other EV pickup available in the U.S. market in early 2022 is Rivian’s R1T. However, more manufacturers like Ford and Chevrolet are planning to release their own EV pickups, and Tesla’s Cybertruck has been in the works for years.
And new EVs are quickly entering the market. For example, BMW’s all-electric i4 and iX have only recently become available for sale in the U.S.
There are a number of domestic and international manufacturers that sell EVs in America, including German manufacturer Audi, Swedish carmaker Volvo, and South Korean manufacturer Kia.
Here’s a breakdown of the 18 different manufacturers on the list, six of which are U.S. based:
Tesla has the highest number of EV models on the market, with four different vehicles available: the Model S, Model X, Model Y, and the Model 3. It’s one of the few manufacturers on the list that exclusively makes electric cars—the only others being Rivian and Lucid.
While anticipation has been building around Tesla’s Cybertruck, and murmurs of a cheaper Tesla have been circulating, Tesla’ CEO Elon Musk has confirmed that there will be no new Tesla models released in 2022. The company will instead focus on its existing models for the time being.
It’s important to note that, while EV adoption in America has increased over the years, the U.S. is still lagging behind other countries. Between 2015 and 2020, America’s EV fleet grew at an annual rate of 28%, while China’s grew by 51%, and Europe increased by 41%.
Why are so many Americans dragging their feet when it comes to electric cars? According to a survey by Pew Research Center, the cost is a big barrier, as well as concerns over their reliability compared to gas vehicles.
But with gas prices at all-time highs, and as consumers grow increasingly concerned over the carbon costs of gas vehicles, switching to an electric car may soon be too hard to resist.
How Far Are We From Phasing Out Coal?
Mapped: U.S. Wind Electricity Generation by State
Timeline: The Rise, Fall, and Return of the Hummer
Understanding Zinc’s Role in a Low-Carbon Economy
Objects of Desire: Record Breaking Auction Sales in 2021
How Automaker Logos Have Evolved Over the Past Century
The Richest People in the World in 2022
A Decade of Elon Musk’s Tweets, Visualized
The field of synthetic biology could solve problems in a wide range of industries, from medicine to agriculture—here’s how.
Published
on
By
Synthetic biology (synbio) is a field of science that redesigns organisms in an effort to enhance and support human life. According to one projection, this rapidly growing field of science is expected to reach $28.8 billion in global revenue by 2026.
Although it has the potential to transform many aspects of society, things could go horribly wrong if synbio is used for malicious or unethical reasons. This infographic explores the opportunities and potential risks that this budding field of science has to offer.
We’ve covered the basics of synbio in previous work, but as a refresher, here’s a quick explanation of what synbio is and how it works.
Synbio is an area of scientific research that involves editing and redesigning different biological components and systems in various organisms.
It’s like genetic engineering but done at a more granular level—while genetic engineering transfers ready-made genetic material between organisms, synbio can build new genetic material from scratch.
This field of science has a plethora of real-world applications that could transform our everyday lives. A study by McKinsey found over 400 potential uses for synbio, which were broken down into four main categories:
If those potential uses become reality in the coming years, they could have a direct economic impact of up to $3.6 trillion per year by 2030-2040.
The medical and health sector is predicted to be significantly influenced by synbio, with an economic impact of up to $1.3 trillion each year by 2030-2040.
Synbio has a wide range of medical applications. For instance, it can be used to manipulate biological pathways in yeast to produce an anti-malaria treatment.
It could also enhance gene therapy. Using synbio techniques, the British biotech company Touchlight Genetics is working on a way to build synthetic DNA without the use of bacteria, which would be a game-changer for the field of gene therapy.
Synbio has the potential to make a big splash in the agricultural sector as well—up to $1.2 trillion per year by as early as 2030.
One example of this is synbio’s role in cellular agriculture, which is when meat is created from cells directly. The cost of creating lab-grown meat has decreased significantly in recent years, and because of this, various startups around the world are beginning to develop a variety of cell-based meat products.
Using synthetic biology, products could be tailored to suit an individual’s unique needs. This would be useful in fields such as genetic ancestry testing, gene therapy, and age-related skin procedures.
By 2030-2040, synthetic biology could have an economic impact on consumer products and services to the tune of up to $800 billion per year.
Synbio could also be used to boost efficiency in clean energy and biofuel production. For instance, microalgae are currently being “reprogrammed” to produce clean energy in an economically feasible way.
This, along with other material and energy improvements through synbio methods, could have a direct economic impact of up to $300 billion each year.
While the potential economic and societal benefits of synthetic biology are vast, there are a number of risks to be aware of as well:
According to a group of scientists at the University of Edinburgh, communication between the public, synthetic biologists, and political decision-makers is crucial so that these societal and environmental risks can be mitigated.
Despite the risks involved, innovation in synbio is happening at a rapid pace.
By 2030, most people will have likely eaten, worn, or been treated by a product created by synthetic biology, according to synthetic biologist Christopher A. Voigt.
Our choices today will dictate the future of synbio, and how we navigate through this space will have a massive impact on our future—for better, or for worse.
In 2021 coal-fired electricity generation reached all-time highs, rising 9% from the year prior. Here’s what it’d take to phase it out of the energy mix.
Published
on
By
This was originally posted on Elements. Sign up to the free mailing list to get beautiful visualizations on natural resource megatrends in your email every week.
At the COP26 conference last year, 40 nations agreed to phase coal out of their energy mixes.
Despite this, in 2021, coal-fired electricity generation reached all-time highs globally, showing that eliminating coal from the energy mix will not be a simple task.
This infographic shows the aggressive phase-out of coal power that would be required in order to reach net zero goals by 2050, based on an analysis by Ember that uses data provided by the International Energy Agency (IEA).
Coal-powered electricity generation rose by 9.0% in 2021 to 10,042 Terawatt-hours (TWh), marking the biggest percentage rise since 1985.
The main reason is cost. Coal is the world’s most affordable energy fuel. Unfortunately, low-cost energy comes at a high cost for the environment, with coal being the largest source of energy-related CO2 emissions.
China has the highest coal consumption, making up 54% of the world’s coal electricity generation. The country’s consumption jumped 12% between 2010 and 2020, despite coal making up a lower percentage of the country’s energy mix in relative terms.
Together, China and India account for 66% of global coal consumption and emit about 35% of the world’s greenhouse gasses (GHG). If you add the United States to the mix, this goes up to 72% of coal consumption and 49% of GHGs.
According to the United Nations, emissions from current and planned fossil energy infrastructure are already more than twice the amount that would push the planet over 1.5°C of global heating, a level that scientists say could bring more intense heat, fire, storms, flooding, and drought than the present 1.2°C.
Apart from being the largest source of CO2 emissions, coal combustion is also a major threat to public health because of the fine particulate matter released into the air.
As just one example of this impact, a recent study from Harvard University estimates air pollution from fossil fuel combustion is responsible for 1 in 5 deaths globally.
Coal-powered electricity generation must fall by 13% every year until 2030 to achieve the Paris Agreement’s goals of keeping global heating to only 1.5 degrees.
To reach the mark, countries would need to speed up the shift from their current carbon-intensive pathways to renewable energy sources like wind and solar.
How fast the transition away from coal will be achieved depends on a complicated balance between carbon emissions cuts and maintaining economic growth, the latter of which is still largely dependent on coal power.
How Much Radiation is Emitted by Popular Smartphones?
How Do Big Tech Giants Make Their Billions?
Satellite Maps: Shanghai’s Supply Chain Standstill
Everything You Need to Know on Carlin-Type Gold Deposits
Visualizing Companies with the Most Patents Granted in 2021
Mapped: U.S. Wind Electricity Generation by State
Timeline: The Rise, Fall, and Return of the Hummer
Why Investors Tuned Out Netflix
Copyright © 2022 Visual Capitalist

source